FAQ

1. Where can I find parking?

The best places to park are on the residential streets adjacent to our building. SE 13th and 14th avenue between Division and Clinton Street provide plenty of parking space. Additionally, Elliot Street in Ladd’s addition (across Division from our building) provides another good parking spot. We do not have our own parking lot, but the residential parking is all free. Remember to be careful if you park directly in front of the building during commuter hours: 7-9am and 4-6pm you will be towed if you are not in compliance with the posted signs.

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2. Do you take insurance?

 

Yes, we are on most insurance panels (see that list and other resources on our Insurance Self-Call Questionnaire), so please have your insurance card(s) on hand when you give us a call. We do our best to talk to a representative about your benefits before your first appointment, however, this is not our obligation. We understand that the insurance language is confusing. Our insurance questionnaire will help you navigate this yourself, but we are always happy to help if you run into any issues. Please be aware that insurance policies are constantly changing. It’s important for you to be involved in this process. As a courtesy, we will bill your insurance.

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3. Can I see you for Motor Vehicle Accidents or Worker’s Compensation injuries?

 

Absolutely! And here’s why you want to see us – not simply because we have over 25 years of experience treating these cases, hundreds of hours of soft tissue (ie. ligament, disc, cartilage) injury education & training, AND know when and whom you should be referred to if necessary, but because we hold the ethical bar high for our profession. As a result, we have gained the confidence of both our legal & medical colleagues and have the honor of their referrals for decades. We are honest to you and the insurance companies and we go to bat for our patients if they are poorly treated/disrespected by claims adjusters, through the sometimes arduous process of personal injury. By maintaining a high degree of integrity throughout the legal process, our efforts commonly result in positive outcomes.

NOTE: In the state of Oregon, Chiropractors are primary health care providers. We provide complete care; we provide the diagnosis, handle Xray, MRI, MD referrals, and prescribe physical therapy as well as soft tissue massage. An outside referral is not needed for us to see you!

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4. Do you require X-Rays prior to treatment?

 

We do not require x-rays for every new patient; the need for an X-ray is entirely dependent on our clinical findings during your exam and history. If an x-ray is needed, we will gladly refer you to one of the many radiologists within your network for a quick imaging appointment. We advise that you bring us as much relevant info as you have, including prior x-rays, and you can even send them early. If another provider has your medical info, you will need to sign their release of records form.

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5. Do I tip my massage therapist?

 

They sure would love that! Our LMTs, of course, are paid a competitive hourly wage.

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6. Can pregnant women receive chiropractic care?

 

For sure! We love treating through pregnancy and think it’s an honor! Not only do pregnant moms feel better with body work, giving stretch and muscle work to the soft tissues and muscular attachments of the pelvis but might be welcomed during the birth process. Dr.’s Lennon and Mulnick together have nearly 70 years of experience working with pregnant women and both have provided care in women health (pap and pelvic exams) from the beginning of their careers out of UWS.

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7. How often should I come in for treatment?

 

Frequency of treatment is generally dependent upon your diagnosis. We tend to see people a bit more in the acute phase of their injury, and later (w/in 2-4 week) we encourage the patient to spend more time at home with rehabilitative stretches and exercises specific to their injury. As they phase out of the acute stage and can manage the repetition and micro-traumas of life on their own, we ask them to let us check on them at least monthly or seasonally if necessary.

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8. Once I begin, will I need to keep getting treatments for the rest of my life like some people say?

 

Commonly our patients do tend to see a higher level of wellness after having consistent care so they do tend to return somewhat regularly. But the specific regularity is up to them. Often once you enjoy the increased joint mobility, decreased muscle tension and overall enhanced postural strength & awareness, you tend to want to return routinely. I think about half of our patients don’t wait until they are really broken down or in pain before they come in. Often they become more attuned to their bodies and want to have us evaluate them preventively. Chiropractic has a strong historical foundation touting the body’s innate ability to heal itself and it may do so more powerfully with regular hands-on and manipulation to clear out nerve interference. We trust you to decide this for yourself.

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9. How do I know if chiropractic therapy will help me?

 

Chiropractic care looks so different depending on the diagnosis and who delivers the care. We will be honest with you and work together with you to decide if and what type of care seems best for your diagnosis. A lot of our patients do not like to “get cracked” I don’t blame them. It’s not for everybody. The benefits of that type of treatment must be indicated and clearly outweigh other options (injections/drugs,surgery, etc). This is very specific to each diagnosis. We sometimes refer out to Physical Therapists, Athletic trainers, Acupuncturists, Orthopedists, Homeopathic clinicians or Naturopaths routinely because it may be a better match for what that particular patient needs.

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10. Can you treat areas other than the spine?

 

Absolutely! Thank goodness too, because we love to treat other joints and often times the real problem actually stems from a different part of the body. The lower extremity treatments alone comprise about 35% of our practice. Achilles tendonitis and Morton’s Neuroma are seen weekly and sometimes daily in our practice. The shoulder and wrist treatments comprise about 20% of our practice. We treat everything from tailbone to cranium and toe to finger.

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11. When is massage therapy recommended?

 

Massage therapy is recommended often times when a problem is chronic and/or a patient has muscle tissue that is in spasm or has become fibrotic (non-elastic and scarred from overuse). Often times massage is needed in order to relax an area and increase blood supply for more rapid healing.

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12. Why are supplements recommended?

 

Supplements are recommended for varying reasons. Most commonly they are taken for inflammation control in lieu of advil or for wellness. More specifically we can also identify and treat mineral and vitamin deficiencies and help with specific imbalances in the body’s chemistry.

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13. What kind of education and training does one undergo to become a Doctor of Chiropractic?

 

To attend Chiropractic College, you must first complete prerequisites, typically in the form of an undergraduate degree (Bachelors of Science). Once you are admitted, you study full time with a demanding course load (about 32 credit hours per term) for 4 years (or 12 quarters at Western States Chiropractic College). At this point, you can complete the national board exam and the even more difficult state board exam.

Chiropractic programs require at least 4,200 hours of combined classroom, laboratory, and clinical experience. The last 2 years stress courses in manipulation and spinal adjustment and provide clinical experience in physical and laboratory diagnosis, orthopedics, neurology, geriatrics, and nutrition. To qualify for licensure, graduates must pass at least 4 (NBCE parts I – IV) and in some jurisdictions 5 (NBCE Physiotherapy) examinations from the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners and complete State specific requirements. All licensing boards in the US require the completion of a 4-year program at an accredited college leading to the DC degree. Once licensed, most states require chiropractors to attend 12–50 hours of continuing education annually. Chiropractic colleges also offer postdoctoral training in chiropractic neurology, orthopedics, sports injuries, nutrition, industrial consulting, rehabilitation, radiology, family practice, pediatrics, and applied chiropractic sciences. After such training, chiropractors may take exams leading to “diplomate” status in a given specialty including orthopedics, neurology and radiology.

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