FAQ

1. What are your Covid-19 Safety Protocols?

2. Where can I find parking?

3. Do you take insurance?

4. Can I see you for Motor Vehicle Accidents or Worker’s Compensation injuries?

5. Do you require X-Rays prior to treatment?

6. Do I tip my massage therapist?

7. Can pregnant women receive chiropractic care?

8. How often should I come in for treatment?

9. Once I begin, will I need to keep getting treatments for the rest of my life like some people say?

10. How do I know if chiropractic therapy will help me?

11. Can you treat areas other than the spine?

12. When is massage therapy recommended?

13. Why are supplements recommended?

14. What kind of education and training does one undergo to become a Doctor of Chiropractic?

1. Covid-19 Safety Protocols

  • We screen all new patients using a questionnaire to collect information about health and vaccination status.

  • We take every patient’s temperature upon arrival 

  • We ask that every patient wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon arrival

  •  No cancelation fee’s for missed appointments due to illness or symptoms related to Covid-19

2. Where can I find parking?

The best places to park are on the residential streets adjacent to our building. SE 13th and 14th avenue between Division and Clinton Street provide plenty of parking space. Additionally, Elliot Street in Ladd’s addition (across Division from our building) provides another good parking spot. We do not have our own parking lot, but the residential parking is all free. Remember to be careful if you park directly in front of the building during commuter hours: 7-9am and 4-6pm you will be towed if you are not in compliance with the posted signs.

3. Do you take insurance?

Yes, we are on most insurance panels (see that list and other resources on our Insurance Self-Call Questionnaire). Please have your insurance card(s) on hand when you give us a call. We do our best to talk to a representative about your benefits before your first appointment, however, this is not our obligation. We understand that the insurance language is confusing. Our insurance questionnaire will help you navigate this yourself, but we are always happy to help if you run into any issues. Please be aware that insurance policies are constantly changing, it’s important for you to be involved in this process.

4. Can I see you for Motor Vehicle Accidents or Worker’s Compensation injuries?

Yes, we have over 25 years of experience treating MVA and WC cases. Over the years we’ve accumulated hundreds of hours of soft tissue injury training and education. 

NOTE: In the state of Oregon, Chiropractors are primary health care providers. We provide complete care; we provide the diagnosis, handle Xray, MRI, referrals, and prescribe physical therapy as well as soft tissue massage. 

5.Do you require X-Rays prior to treatment?

We do not require x-rays for new patients; the need for an X-ray is entirely dependent on our clinical findings during your initial exam and info regarding your health history. If an x-ray is needed we will gladly refer you to a radiologist within your insurance network.  However, we do advise that you bring prior x-rays with you to your visit. If you need help getting images sent from another facility contact the front desk and an associate will assist you.

6.Do I tip my massage therapist?

Tipping is acceptable and much appreciated, but obviously not required.  

7. Can pregnant women receive chiropractic care?

Yes, it’s an honor for us to administer care for you during this incredible time. Please call our office or email with specific questions regarding care.

8. How often should I come in for treatment?

Frequency of treatment varies depending on the circumstances of each case and is generally dependent upon your diagnosis/treatment plan made by your physician.

9. How do I know if chiropractic therapy will help me?

Chiropractic care looks so different depending on the diagnosis and who administers the care. We will work together with you to decide if and what type of care seems best for you. If we feel that we can not fully treat you here we will refer you to a recommended physician in our local area.

11. Can you treat areas other than the spine?

Absolutely, lower extremity treatments alone comprise about 35% of our practice. Achilles tendonitis and Morton’s Neuroma are seen weekly and sometimes daily in our practice. Shoulder and wrist treatments comprise about 20% of our practice. 

12. When is massage therapy recommended?

Often times Massage therapy is recommended when a problem is chronic and/or a patient has muscle tissue that is in spasm or has become fibrotic (non-elastic and scarred from overuse). Massage can help relax an area and increase blood supply for more rapid healing.

13. Why are supplements recommended?

Supplements are recommended for varying reasons. For example, treating mineral and vitamin deficiencies.

14.What kind of education and training does one undergo to become a Doctor of Chiropractic?

 To attend Chiropractic College, you must first complete prerequisites, typically in the form of an undergraduate degree (Bachelors of Science). Once you are admitted, you study full time with a demanding course load (about 32 credit hours per term) for 4 years (or 12 quarters at Western States Chiropractic College). At this point, you can complete the national board exam and the even more difficult state board exam.

Chiropractic programs require at least 4,200 hours of combined classroom, laboratory, and clinical experience. The last 2 years stress courses in manipulation and spinal adjustment and provide clinical experience in physical and laboratory diagnosis, orthopedics, neurology, geriatrics, and nutrition. To qualify for licensure, graduates must pass at least 4 (NBCE parts I – IV) and in some jurisdictions 5 (NBCE Physiotherapy) examinations from the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners and complete State specific requirements. All licensing boards in the US require the completion of a 4-year program at an accredited college leading to the DC degree. Once licensed, most states require chiropractors to attend 12–50 hours of continuing education annually. Chiropractic colleges also offer postdoctoral training in chiropractic neurology, orthopedics, sports injuries, nutrition, industrial consulting, rehabilitation, radiology, family practice, pediatrics, and applied chiropractic sciences. After such training, chiropractors may take exams leading to “diplomate” status in a given specialty including orthopedics, neurology and radiology.

 

Please see the following links for relevant info: